#ATOZCHALLENGE DAY 20: T for TSUNAMI | My experience

** Disclaimer : Lengthy Post **

It was a wonderful Sunday, 26th December 2004, a day just after the Christmas. Studying a convent school Christmas was a huge celebration for us in school and after week-long Christmas activities it was time to be back to studies. I was in my 11th standard and had my morning Chemistry tuition. As usual my dad left me at the tuition center and went to the temple as there was some special day (Makaravilaku Pooja). My mother and elder brother were at home and sleeping. Since the day starts pretty early in the islands, my tuition was around 5 am in the morning much better than the 4 am mathematics tuition I went. 

We were in the middle of the class when at about 6 am the plastic chair in which my sir was seated started shaking. Since our sir always used to play pranks on us, we thought this was also another prank and were about to ignore it when the wooden sofa in which we were seated also started shaking terribly. And it just struck us that it’s another earthquake and we all stood up to rush out. Living in Andaman, earthquakes was never new to us, the islands are on the tectonic plates hence earthquake was not something the locals were not aware of. Only thing different about this time’s earthquake was that as we were heading outside the house the tremors were not stopping at all and it was more than just few seconds. We were not even able to walk out properly, the tremors were that bad and somehow we were all out under the open. I even fell down and broke my specs that I was wearing. I think the tremors lasted for at least 5 minutes which was unusual and then it stopped. By that time everyone was outside their houses and shocked as to what had just happened. We were just making sure that everyone was okay. Our sir told us to call our parents and called off the classes. All my close friends stayed in the same area so they all rushed to their houses to see if everything was okay. I gave a ring to my dad and he was also in shock and said he felt the tremors too and is on his way to pick me up.

Car Nicobar beaches destroyed by Tsunami

Dad came and picked me up. Before we left the area he suggested that we go and buy some fresh vegetables from the harbor side market and some sea food. We also went and met one of our relatives whose house was very close to the harbor. They stayed in government quarters and there were major cracks in the floor and walls. We checked on them and went to the market.  Suddenly we heard people talking that the passenger waiting hall at the port broke and fell in the sea, I was very curious to see it and started insisting on my dad that we go have a check. My dad scolded me and was like there would be too much crowd and the police would start chasing off people, so we better hurry up and reach home. He tried to call the landline but it was out-of-order and we assumed it to be because of the tremors. While we were hurrying buying few grocery we suddenly saw the crowd running towards us from the harbor and shouting “paani aa raha hai “ which meant water is coming. All of us around there couldn’t understand what meant by “pani aa raha hai” and the need to run. For the local this only meant the daily water supply that all the houses get and so people running shouting this line was weird. We tried to look a little further and we saw something that I would have never ever thought of or would ever want to see it again.

At about 6.30 am a huge wave almost five times the height of me (am 5”2) coming towards the market area and people running away from it. We couldn’t believe our eyes and all we wanted was to RUN. This was the same wave which hit Chennai and other places in India at about 9.30 am. My dad started the bike and we were riding as fast as possible among the chaos which already had started by this time. I still remember the moment when we were passing by the main road and the parallel street where the water was just flooding in was where my friends stayed. Tears rolled down my eyes because it was too late for us to go warn them and as the corner of my eye could see as far as possible it was water filling up the roads and houses. The only thought running in my dad and my mind was to reach home and be with mom and brother before we breathe our last. Meanwhile tremors kept happening and we were trying to warn as many people on the road shouting “pani aa raha hia” and like us no one was able to figure out what it meant. By the time we reached home mom and brother were standing in the front yard and looking panicked. Many of the coconut trees and other trees were uprooted or fallen down due to the earthquake. We tried explaining what we saw near the harbor and asked mom and brother to pack up anything important and to leave to some higher ground. Our house was near a school ground which was on a pretty higher area we decided to move up there. My mom just took some water bottle changed her night-dress and we headed to the big ground. By the time we reached almost everyone in our locality were also present there. I remember before leaving the house the huge crack on the floor and walls and were not even sure if we would come back alive. We were only happy for the fact that all four of us were together now. Everyone started talking what happened. None of us had ever heard of the natural phenomenon called Tsunami. We kept hearing people here and there as they came to the ground that the water is coming in big height waves and people are being taken into the sea etc. We stayed in the ground a day or two. I am still not able to remember what happened actually. The tremors continued but not like the one in the morning. When things got a little cooled down we came home. Everything was shut, no electricity no landline connection nothing at all. 

In this photo released by the Indian Coast Guard, a view of the North Sentinel Island from which the sea retracted after the Dec. 26 tsunami, and exposed coral reefs, foreground, in India’s Andaman and Nicobar archipelago.

This was my last memory of the tsunami. Thankfully other than the cracks in the house and the trees getting uprooted nothing happened to us or in our area since it was in a heighted place. But as hours went by we started hearing about people whom we know who got wiped off in the tsunami waves, their houses lost, family members lost. So many of my very close people lost lives. My friend Kavita’s dad who was posted in another island survived day one of the tsunami waves but eventually we never head back from him ever again. I remember my mom’s close friend who lost her elder son daughter in law and both the grand children in the tsunami. As days went by we got to know how severe the tsunami was in the islands. Due to lack of connectivity there was a huge communication gap. Once the landlines were up we informed our relatives in Kerala that all of us were fine and nothing happened to us. Then the news channels started showing the tsunami breaking news and even then it was about how badly Chennai was hit and “also Andaman”. 

The world especially India didn’t know how badly the Andaman and specially the Nicobar islands were hit by the Tsunami until the journalist Deepak Chourasia reached the islands. Almost 3 to 4 huge water wave wall swiped the entire island chain to destruction. Cars and other vehicles on the trees, house demolished, and roads filled with water. The entire air force residential area in the Nicobar Island got swept out. The Trinket Island broke into three pieces. The southernmost tip of India – Indira point’s light house was submerged by 4 mts. Many other islands. We kept hearing news of family and friends who lost lives. How bad the damage was and the relief work which started. Every day we would hear the news of someone found in some place, the lucky ones or the bodies of someone found under some building. It was a bad time. I remember since many schools were ruined and teachers lost their lives the public was being brought to Port Blair and all the city school students were sent to the relief camps for teaching them. I think this was about a month or so am not sure. I remember teaching the primary class students and like me many other people had started coming in to help in the relief work.

Reefs visible after the water levels changed

I was lucky to not have faced any personal loss not even materialistic but this event would always remind us of how small we are in front of nature. I remember a girl from my school Almas she was in 5th standard then.

Almas, 5th standard. Resting at her relatives place after being rescued from Nancowrie

Her missing report was being shown all over the news channels. She had lost her dad, her mother her younger sister and everyone from her maternal side in the tsunami. And the relief soldiers found her after some days. When the former President Late Shri A.P.J Abdul Kalam visited the islands few of us from the school were sent to attend the event and he called for this girl and made her sit on his lap and pamper her. It was an emotional scene leaving everyone’s eye wet. 

Locals of Nicobar Island

Andaman and Nicobar Islands survived the 9.2 Richter scale earthquake which triggered the Tsunami. It took the islanders about a year or so to come into regular life but we did. We didn’t lose faith and hope and we didn’t fight over things. We helped each other and stood by each other. We opened our doors for the homeless, we shared whatever we could with the deprived ones.

Loveleena, 4, receives food at a relief camp in Port Blair in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands on Jan 5, 2005.

Well this was my experience of the Tsunami. Just to state some more generic information about one of world’s tragic incident.

  • The western coast of Indonesia was shaken by a 9.2 magnitude earthquake, the fourth biggest in recent times.
  • The damage was felt in 14 countries, and 1.7m were made homeless in the aftermath. It was not one but subsequent Tsunami waves that left so many people homeless
  • It was also the longest earthquake ever recorded, lasting for between eight and ten minutes. Normally, a moderate earthquake might last a few seconds.
  • There was no tsunami warning system in the Indian Ocean to detect tsunamis or to warn the hundreds of thousands of people who lived in coastal areas.
  • Banda Aceh is the worst hit, with more than 60 per cent of its buildings destroyed by a wave that was over 30ft high.
  • The gap between the first Tsunami wave and the next was very less which left people surprised and no chance to recover from what happened.
  • The city of Port Blair, got saved because of the Ross island which divided the huge waves to two parts
  • The ancient knowledge of secret signals in the wind and sea combined to save the five indigenous tribes living for centuries in the Andaman and Nicobar islands from the catastrophic tsunami.
  • Katchal Island, part of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, was one of the worst affected of the islands having lost some 90 percent of it’s population in the devastation by the tsunami waves.
  • As of today, many tsunami warning systems have been established and whenever there is heavy cyclone, depression or earthquake Tsunami warning is sent out across the island chain to warn people.

Its only during natural calamities that brings humans close to each other and when humanity against nature is tested. And time has proven that always the latter has won.

I dedicate this post to all those who lost their lives all over the world in the 26th December 2004 Tsunami. I also dedicate this post to all the family and friends of the people who lost their lives for whom it was such a big loss. I dedicate this post to all those people who contributed even in the tiniest way possible to support the relief work. God bless all !!!

Happy Blogging!!! Live.Love.Laugh ❤ ❤ ❤

#ATOZCHALLENGE DAY 18: R for ROSS ISLAND | Remains of History

~~ It feels good to be lost in the right direction ~~

Click by me (sometimes i manage to capture something nice)

Ross Island was discovered by Archibald Blair, a prominent hydrographer of the East India Company and later Governor General of India in the late 18th century. Ross Island once an administrative headquarter of the Britishers is just few miles from the Port Blair before the moved out from here to Port Blair due to the 1941’s earthquake.Until then the Britishers settled in the Ross Island with their families and all the basic amenities like Bakery, Church, Water Distillation plant, Hospital, swimming pool, tennis court etc was made available for the families. 

Water Distillation Unit

This made it easier for the British officers to row down to Port Blair and monitor the construction of the Cellular Jail which is visible from the island. Also, the name of the island was given after Sir Daniel Ross, a known marine survivor of the days.

The port at Ross Island

Currently the Indian Navy has rebuilt some of the remaining structures like the bakery to make these remain for a little more longer in the history. Below is an image of the Church in the 1940’s and now.

The Church back in 1940’s at Ross Island
The Church now

This island has no settlement and only people who are put up here are the Indian Navy for security reasons. Tourists generally come here for 2 to 3 hours considering its one of the must visit place in your Andaman vacation travel, but if ask me it’s a place where you can spend a whole day and still not want to leave it.

Did you notice the peacock?

The best part about this island is you can walk around the coastline and complete one full circle of the island spread over 70 acres:) while witnessing beautiful seascape, trees, birds, peacocks and deer  up close which would be a breathtaking moment as it’s not possible in today’s city life where all you can see is buildings, malls and roads around you.

Shades of blueeeee

Since the island is right in the middle of the sea, one can experience cool wind breeze which is very refreshing.  

The beach is very small in width on the other end, also if you notice every where boards are placed stating not to loiter the place.

One can explore all the remains of the British settlement and this might even surprise you that they had even built up tramlines. There is another theory which says there is a high possibility of a underground sea tunnel which was built from Ross Island to Port Blair. The exit point being under the huge Mahatma Gandhi Statue reading a book in the Gandhi Park. 

The Japanese occupation of the Andaman Islands occurred in 1942 during the WWII. The Japanese bunkers and cannon still stand as a memorial in this island.  
Japanese bunker

A light and sound show similar to the one in Cellular Jail is shown from Monday to Sunday except on Wednesdays and Public Holidays. The show starts at 5.15 pm and one can take the 4 pm boat from the water sports complex in Port Blair and to reach the island after the 15 min boat ride. 

North Bay Island as seen from Ross Island

Note for first timers – Do not expect any water sports activity here or restaurants except for a couple or two small tea shops run by the navy. Do carry your ID card because it would be registered in the log books of the Indian Navy. Because it is a remote island, please carry all essentials. You won’t find a shop.Do not visit the island without a watch on your hand, because you can be mesmerized by the beauty of the island and easily miss your ferry back 🙂 🙂 🙂

Ross Island by far is my favorite place/island ( 😉 ) of all the islands in Andaman and Nicobar and surprisingly this island does not have a beach. Yes! Now you may wonder how come an island does not have a beach  secondly why would a place without a beach be my favorite even though there are other beautiful places like the Radhanagar beach or the Neil Island. And I totally agree, it’s a fair question. 

Aerial image of Ross Island

My top five reasons why I love the Ross Island are  

  1. It’s just 15 to 20 minute boat ride from Port Blair and hence the most visited island. Also it’s called the gateway of Port Blair as its present right in the middle of the open ocean. 
  2. These islands have super friendly deers that come close to you (reminder: Feeding these deers is a punishable offense) 
  3. If lucky you would end up seeing a couple or more peacocks. As a kid when there were not much tourists visiting these islands, I remember looking for peacock feathers fallen on the ground and would always be lucky to get at least one.
    The old printing press

     

  4. These islands are picturesque even more because of it ruined architecture. The old remains of the British settlement now standing with the support of banyan trees and nature taking over the creation of man engulfing all of it on its own. This island definitely makes you feel nostalgic. 
  5. The best part side of the island is the back side the one which faces to the open ocean. Earlier when people used to visit these islands for picnic they would settle down almost near the port side and have fun but my family always used to walk down to the other side. A 10 minute walk and the other side of these islands is open. Before Tsunami there was a small stretch of beach where we would spread our mats and sit and have fun but post Tsunami, the beach got sinked. It was because of Ross Island that the Capital city, Port Blair was saved from one of history’s tragic earthquake and tsunami, the water waves which were almost 10-15 meters in height got divided into two directions once it hit the Ross Island. The damage done was the submersion of the small peaceful beach on this opposite side I am talking. Now It’s just few rocks and then directly the open ocean. 

So yeah there you go, all the reasons why I love this island. And all my reasons justified in these images you saw so far. I must tell you this is one island when you won’t stop clicking pictures 🙂 

Still not over, hold on few more 😛

Night view of Ross Island from Port Blair – PC : Experience Andamans
The coconut trees
The Banyan trees that engulf the whole island

Happy Blogging!!! Live.Love.Laugh ❤ ❤ ❤

#ATOZCHALLENGE DAY 16: P for Planning a trip to Andaman? Must know!

Andaman and Nicobar Islands are famous for its pristine blue beaches and white sands and are home to some things which are unique Only to Andamans, yet there is a lack of clarity when one decides to make a trip to these beautiful islands.

It is even more saddening when the Indian people themselves lack knowledge of these islands , you wouldn’t agree but we the people of Andaman have been asked weirdest of weirdest questions for example – Do we wear clothes? Do we speak tribal language? Do we need a passport to go home? Do we have the usual mode of transport within the islands etc etc.

So in today’s post i talk about all those basic questions that arise if one decides to travel to the islands. Hope this helps, if yes please do share this post with your family and friends and other bloggers 🙂 #happytohelp 

DO YOU NEED PASSPORT AND VISA?

I have been asked this question a hundred times whether one needs a passport and especially a visa to travel to the islands which is shocking when a fellow Indian asks this question. Anyways, the answer is NO. Since Andaman and Nicobar Islands also BELONG TO INDIA, one does not need a passport or a visa to visit the islands if you are an Indian National. However for Foreigners (non – Indians), apart from the passport a RAP – Restricted Area Permit is needed to visit the island(s). And this can be easily obtained once you land at the Port Blair airport or the harbour. 

BEST TIME TO TRAVEL TO THE ISLANDS

The ideal season to plan your vacation to the islands is from October to May end. The weather remains perfect for an ideal beach vacation and therefore making it the “peak” season as well. Hence plan well in advance, i would suggest at least 3 to 4 months before so that even the flight fares are reasonable and is not stopping you from making a trip to the islands. I have heard many of my friends say why go to the Andaman for the same flight fares one can do a foreign country trip, which i agree. So plan well in advance! unless you are the impromptu kinds 😛

Personal suggestion – go sometime in Feb month, it is kind of the right time where the crowd is also not too much and you get ample time to enjoy all the places. 

HOW TO REACH?

Port Blair is actually well connected to major cities in India by air. There are flights extensively from Chennai and Kolkata besides Delhi, Bangalore. The Chennai and Kolkata flights are direct non stop flights while others have a stop or layover. There are about 11 flights from Chennai to Port Blair alone in a day.

One can also chose to travel to the islands via a ship which is a THREE DAY travel. Five ships operate from Chennai, Visakhapatnam and Kolkata to Port Blair which run on schedules (and only cancel if weather conditions are bad specially during monsoons). You can check for the ship schedules from your tour operators if you wish to take this journey. Also to add, do not expect them to be the cruise ships that are shown in movies yet they have basic amenities like theatre, cafeteria, deck canteen, recreation room, swimming pool etc. 

HOW MANY DAY WILL YOU NEED?

Hmmm.. my honest opinion if you ever plan a trip to the islands please make sure its for a minimum of seven days(trust me even then you would miss out on few places). A week is at least needed to experience all the amazing things these beautiful islands have to offer you. If you do not want to spend so much time then i would suggest a 3 night 4 days trip so that you can go to Havelock and Neil Islands and spend time there after visiting the Cellular Jail and beach in Port Blair on your arrival day.

Recent trip my friends made the plan was – Day 1(arrival day) visit the Cellular Jail, city tour. Day 2 – Ross Island and North Bay , Day 3 – Neil Island stay the night there Day 4 – Havelock, my friends spent three nights there (we could have shortened it and seen the limestone caves but we were too much in love with the beaches of Havelock) Day 7 – Back to Port Blair and city tour Day 8 morning leave islands. 

Sands Marina – Havelock

WHERE TO STAY

The Port Blair would offer you stay for all budget criteria but it gets a little tricky when you visit the other islands like Neil and Havelock since the infrastructure is limited. Also the food in restaurants in these islands are a little too pricy since majority of the food supplies like vegetables comes from Port Blair and to Port Blair from Chennai and Kolkata. Transportation costs are charged on food supplies. Even for locals like us, we pay high prices for vegetables and fruits. Thankfully am a sea food lover and fish and sea food is pretty cheap.

Its ideal to book places for stay well in advance to avoid any last minute problems during peak seasons. Also advised is to chose a place which is close to the sea 🙂  HOW TO GO TO HAVELOCK AND NEIL ISLANDS


There are both government and private run ferry services from Port Blair to the Havelock and Neil Islands. Other than the bad weather condition days, the ferry services operate regularly and on time. The tickets are availed from the counter and no online booking is available. If travelling via a tour operator all the inter island transfer fares are included in your package deal and hence you can avoid all the hassles and tassles. The private cruise – Makruzz is very famous these days as it gives you a personalized and luxurious feel. 
WHAT NOT TO MISS

Cellular Jail at any cost. Not many places in India exist where you get to feel so close to the struggle of Indian Independence by the freedom fighters. The light and sound show in the evening is an added attraction to your visit to the National Heritage of India

– Whether or not you know swimming, SCUBA DIVING IS A MUST. A lifetime experience, trust me this is coming from someone like me who does not know swimming even though am born and brought up there(which is very embarrassing) and still did my first scuba dive. You can do scuba diving for a nominal fare at North Bay or Havelock. Try Barefoot Scuba or Dive India. They have PADI ceritified divers.

– Other water sport activities like snorkeling, which is usually included in your travel package(if not ask for it), jet ski, banana ride.

– If you know surfing, then few of the beaches in Andaman is perfect for surfing.

Ross Island – this is my favourite island, it does not have a beach but its an island right in the middle of the ocean and is usually called the gateway to Port Blair. There is something really nice about this island 🙂

Havelock and Neil if not any of the above

Limestone cave if you are staying for long or can fit it in your itinerary.

– If you are a sea food lover please try the GOLDEN SPOON road side hotel in Havelock. You would thank me your entire life. If you are up for some fun, try the lobsters and crabs 🙂 yummmm!!!! Highly recommended. Well for the vegetarians, there are quite a few vegetarian hotels in all these islands.

– Do not forget to shop for shells and corals from the Sagarika Emporium in Port Blair which is govt run. You would also find such shops in almost all the beach side.

SOME SPOILERS– If you have been to Goa or Gokarna am sure you would expect something similar in the Andaman islands. But sorry to disappoint you , the Andaman and Nicobar islands is a very calm and quite place. Infact ideal for a digital detox cause in some islands there wont be all the cellphone network providers or wifi other than the hotel’s specific areas. There are no shacks on the beach like the ones you see in Goa. Also there is no night life or party places in Port Blair and other islands. One can stroll through the islands or camp in their resort area.

Also its advisable to be a morning person for the few days of your vacation. The sun rises by almost 5am and sun sets by 4.45 -5pm. Hence the early you rise the more chance to see some really breath taking sunrise by the sea, or you can go for a jog or yoga.

Points to Note

Photography is not allowed when you land at the Port Blair Airport due to security reasons.

Littering the beaches is a punishable offense

Sun screen!!! I am sure everyone gets tanned including someone like me when i go on a trip 😛

– Beaches/Areas where warning signs like Swimming is not allowed needs to be taken seriously. Sometimes there are chances that there is a possible presence of crocodiles and hence its better to avoid such place and not ignore. There have been instances in the past where tourists have not taken these sign boards seriously and lost their lives. Do not spoil your vacation cause of your carelessness.

– The islands are bound to have mosquitoes and other insects hence its highly advisable to carry mosquito repellents.

– For the inter ferry travel, if you suffer from sea sickness, please avoid eating too much or too spicy. There are few medicines which can be taken an hour before the travel so that you do not have sea sickness.

– If you are visiting the islands in a scheduled plan, kindly stick to the timings your travel agent/tour operator mentions, there are chances that due to sudden weather changes the timings could be changed. Always try to book your tickets in advance specially during peak season to avoid any last minute surprise(other than the weather which one cannot control)

Carry your ID proof for booking tickets and inter island travels.

Book your water sports in advance to avoid last minute surprises and high prices.

– If travelling with kids and elderly please provide all necessary instructions to your tour operator well in advance.

BONUS TIP – if travelling by flight, please please please make sure you take the window seat!! You would thank me for sure 🙂 While landing and taking off, the view is mesmerizing (if skies are clear).

In my recent trip, i went home a week earlier and then a week later my friends came. Before getting their boarding tickets this was my first tip to them to book a window seat at any cost.

I generally give up my window seat for fellow tourists who sit along with me just so that they get a chance to see this beauty (i am so used to ❤ )

P.S – lengthy post but i thought since i am from Andamans i should give more inputs rather than make it sound like a Travel website. 😛Happy Blogging!!!. Live.Love.Laugh ❤ ❤ ❤

 

#ATOZCHALLENGE DAY 15: O for Out of the Ordinary|Limestone Caves

When one hears of Andaman and Nicobar Islands the only few things that comes in ones mind are Beaches, Cellular Jail and Water sports. But each and every time these islands prove everyone wrong and leaves one with surprise. One such out of the ordinary phenomenon one can witness are the famous LIMESTONE CAVES, yes the ones which form naturally.

From Know Andamans

Baratang is an island situated in the middle Andaman and probably the gateway to many other amazing places these islands hold. Covered with rain forests and surrounded by the mangroves situated almost in the middle of the island chain at about 100 km from Port Blair are these islands. The thick forests of these islands is the home to the famous JARAWA tribes and have been declared as a protected zone by the government.

With only few attractions open to public the journey to this place in itself will give your adrenaline a rush. From a trip in a police protected convoy through the Jarawa Reserve Forest, then your vehicle being transported on a vehicle ferry, a small boat usually called the dingue ride through the thick mangrove swamps and finally a trek in the jungle to reach the Limestone Caves is an adventure in itself.

Apart from the famous Limestone caves, you can also visit the Parrot islands, the blue beach at Baludera and the only mud volcano in south Asia which i had mentioned in my previous post also.
Visiting Baratang is a unique experience in itself, an enthralling journey that awakens deep-seated feelings of wonder wisdom and Knowledge .

Limestone Caves in Baratang Island
A Limestone in simple science is just calcium carbonate. Limestone cave is a natural cavity that is formed underneath the Earth’s surface that can range from a few meters to many kilometers in length and depth. This is generally formed when water containing dissolved carbon dioxide (carbonic acid) seeps into rock crevices and joints. The carbon dioxide comes from decaying organic matter in the soil, and also directly from the atmosphere. 

inside of the Limestone caves

To brief it up its sedimentary rocks formed under the sea due to compression over a million years which give birth to limestone caves. And such a wonder can be found, half an hour from Baratang. A little boat ride and few miles on a walk will bring you to the enthralling limestone caves. Not only are these historic they are also very beautiful. Visitors would need a good torch to make sure the soak in every detail of this place .The most amazing phenomenon is entering the cave and exploring it. It is also recommended that you wear a good quality shoe and brace yourself, for the caves are slippery and dark.

https://www.tripoto.com/trip/andaman-island-9300

These caves are said to be ever evolving, the patterns on them keep changing over the years. The ride back on the dinghy boat is very rewarding. For the sight of mangrove trees subdues every thrill and sweeps in a tranquil and serene aura. The tall magnificent trees, which weirdly enough have their roots above the water level is a must watch. These trees grow in saline water and are a rarity in any other place.

Mud Volcano and Jarawa
A mud volcano is formed by any geo-excreted gasses and liquids. This type of volcano is usually found in subduction zones. Most of the gasses that are released from a mud volcano are methane although they also release much smaller quantities of nitrogen and carbon dioxide. Generally, the ejections from these volcanoes will be fine solids which are suspended in liquids that can include acidic water. Scientists think there may even be a few on Mars.

From Andaman Tourism website

Astonishingly, the only active mud volcano in the south Asia lies in Baratang. The road to Mud volcano is covered around an hour.

But you will have to pass by the Jarawa creek to get here. The Famous Jarawa creek is a lonely planet in itself.
It is the dwelling place of the oldest tribes found in these islands. The tribes known as Jarawas (more on them on a post i missed 😦 which i would publish soon), are aloof from the civilized world. They are the wonder of the modern world, for they feed on raw pigs, fruits, and vegetables. They don’t speak any language known to general public. Their pitch black skin and red eyes will leave you dazzled in case you happen to meet them. 

http://andamanstourism.com

It is recommended that you do not talk or interact with them, without a guide. These tribes are incapable of comprehending and adopting the modern lifestyle. It is said that they have suffered illness and even death due to the food offered by the tourists.

Parrot Island
The dream destination of any heart is the Parrot Island. The luxurious sight of millions of parrots and parakeets at the sun dawn is not exclusive to any other place in the world. But the only rule is, you must stay the night in Baratang to experience this wonder. 

From the Andaman Tourism Website

It’s at sunset, that, a group of parrots comes and hovers over the skies, then they invite their fellow beings to follow. The heart-stopping sight of thousands of parrots and parakeets together in the crimson sky is beyond real. The golden sky with red-blue birds will steal every beat. This island with its beautiful beach and wondrous wildlife is a must visit.

I never got a chance to visit the Limestone Caves and missed it even this time since we couldn’t extend our vacations. Though i have seen the Jarawas when one of them was brought to the main hospital in the capital and were admitted in a room next to my mother’s. It was back in 2004 when i was in my 10th standard, so got lucky to see them a family.

Content from my friend Vivek’s travel website – Tropical Andamans. Please feel free to reach out to him if you ever plan on a vacation to the islands 🙂 or Barefoot Resorts where my brother Sanjay, is the Operational Manager. #happytohelp ❤ 

Happy Blogging!!! Live.Love.Laugh ❤ ❤ ❤

#ATOZCHALLENGE DAY 14: N for Nicobar|Neil|North Bay Islands

Hello wonderful people, how are you guys doing? Hope you had a good weekend and celebrations of Easter and the New Year (for the Indian friends)!!! All I could do was rest as i was not keeping well, even missed publishing the post for Saturday 😦 and had almost thought of discontinuing from the challenge but somehow didn’t want to give up half way.

So as a bonus today in my post i talk about three other well known places (or islands) among the chain of 572 islands that make Andaman and Nicobar Islands in total. Hope you have a good read!! 🙂 

NICOBAR ISLANDS and Car Nicobar
The Andaman and Nicobar Islands as you know are a chain of islands big and small and spread in a vertical landscape in the Bay of Bengal. While many islands come under the Andaman district(per say) the remaining fall under the Nicobar district. The islands under this set comprise of some other well known islands like Little Andaman, Nancowry, Camota, Car Nicobar, Katchal, Great Nicobar (which is the largest island) spread over 1648 km2.
The Nicobar islands are believed to have been inhabited for thousand of years and is home Nicobarese tribes. Six indigenous Nicobarese languages are spoken in these islands. The Nicobarese tribe are the civilized and well educated of all other tribes that inhabit the islands. The Nicobar in itself is also an island where the people live a normal living lifestyle unlike any town or village. About a night journey from the capital Port Blair, these islands are no more permitted for tourist visit. The Car Nicobar has an airstrip but is not open for commercial service and is monitored by the Indian Airforce.

a typical Nicobarese hut

I have been to these islands back in 1997-1999 when my mother was posted in the Malacca town as a high school teacher to these islands for two years. I would visit her on my longer school vacation. The main religion followed in these islands is Christianity. On 31st May 2013, UNESCO had declared these islands as World Biosphere Reserve. The Nicobar islands were the worst hit due to the 26th Dec 2004, Tsunami’s 10-15m high water waves. Some islands even broken into two (Teressa island)to three (Trinket)pieces, and coral reefs moved above water. Almost the entire belt of Nicobar islands was moved to as much as 100 feet by the earthquake and tilted. 
The Nicobarese have a very different law and order and marriage system amongst their clan. They have a Captain like any tribe and its under his command the remaining families live. You can read more about them in my future posts on the tribes of Andamans.

NORTH BAY

The clear waters at North Bay, perfect for snorkelling , sea walk and scuba diving

North Bay island is a popular destination in Port Blair. The beach and the snorkeling opportunities in its fringing coral reefs are the closest ones you will find at Port Blair. A ferry (9 am and 2 pm; 30 mins) will take you across Aberdeen Jetty and bring you back after 3 hour. The corals at North Bay are rather good and spread over large area. You’re very likely to spot many fish, a lobster, or even clams on the coral reef. Snacks and basic meals are available in some shacks on the beach.

This is the same island where my friends and i had gone for scuba diving, you can read about it more on my post My first Scuba Diving Experience

Also its the same island whose image is on the back of the 20 rupee Indian currency 🙂

 When at North Bay, it is time to relax and enjoy. Options such as Snorkeling, Scuba Diving, Sea Walk and many other Sports activities are also available. You can also trek to see the Light House. However, sometimes the light house is closed for outside travelers.


NEIL ISLAND

Neil Island around 37 Kms by sea is a good place for Island hopping. With plenty of marine life. Neil Island dwells with lust green surroundings of paddy fields, banana plantations and tropical trees. It occupies an area of 18.9 square kilometres (7.3 sq mi) and Bengali being the widely spoken language.The islands are famous for it’s own Howrah bridge at the Lakshmanpur beach which is a Natural Rock Formation and one of many rare natural phenomenons. It is best seen during a low tide and the walk to the rock is a little tough. (we missed this spot) 

Pristine sandy beaches at Sitpur, Bharatpur and Lakshmanpur are some of the best beaches to explore. A quite heaven for a traveler. The breathtaking view of sea and the lusting greenary in the island is really rejuvenating and enjoyable for enthusiastic travelers. It is worth spending a few days on Neil Islands – also known as the Kitchen garden of Andaman Islands. 

That is a picture of my friends and me waiting at the Neil Island Harbour for our ship to Havelock. Clicked by Sanjay using his go pro

In our seven day trip we halted at the Neil Islands for one night and it was amazing. We went to all the three beaches. The word Neil means blue and it definitely does justice to its name. Watch this video on the Neil Islands and be mesmerized!!!

Let me know if you were awestruck and fell in love with the blue waters … 🙂 Did you Monday Blues get kicked looking at the amazingly beautiful blue waters? (that was a dumb one) 🙂  Neil Island is a must visit tourist destination if you ever plan on visiting the islands and so is North Bay for the water sports activities.  And you know whom to contact 😉

Happy Blogging!!! Live.Love.Laugh

#ATOZCHALLENGE DAY 12: L for Lesser Known Facts

Hello friends, just when you were getting to know about the beautiful Andaman and Nicobar Islands, I thought of giving you some more information that might interest you. 

So here i am , presenting you the LESSER KNOWN FACTS of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. Have fun reading about it 🙂 

The widely spoken language in the islands is not Andamanese or Nicobarese, it is Bengali followed by Hindi, Tamil, Telugu and Malayalam. Hindi is majorly spoken in the capital Port Blair but rest of the islands like Havelock, Neil, Diglipur etc locally speak Bengali due to their large number of residents being from Bengal and Bangladesh settlers. 

Commercial fishing is banned in the islands. The only export of sea food that happens is authorized by the island’s administration. 

The 20 rupee note which is a currency in India depicts the scene from Andaman and Nicobar Island’s North Bay. Many tourist make a point to capture this exact click as a memory.  

During World War II , Andaman and Nicobar Islands were the only part of India to come under the Japanese occupation. 

These islands received the first sunrise of the millennium, year 2000 in the Katchal Islands. Many scientists and researches had gathered to capture the first rays of the millennium.

The extremely narrow limestone Alfred Caves are home to Swiftlet birds that make edible nests here. The Baratang islands is famous for the natural limestone caves which is a rare phenomenon and very few places in India are known to have this.

Baratang is also the only place in India with mud volcanoes.
Yes you read it right, just like lava these volcanoes erupt mud from the volcano hole.

“Jal Hans” , is India’s first commercial seaplane that was launched in the Islands and not the seaplanes of Mumbai.  

An aerial view of the damaged coast of Indira Point, India’s southern most point, 600 km (about 375 miles) south of Port Blair, in the Andaman and Nicobar archipelago March 1, 2005. 

India’s southernmost point, the Indira Point, subsided by 4.25 metres during the 2004 Tsunami. 

North Sentinel Island is home to one of the most isolated paleolithic tribes of the world. They refrain from any human contact unlike the other tribes of the island Jarawa, Onge, Shompen. Their have been instances where in aerial images of the tribes shooting spear at them. They are thought to be directly descended from the first human populations to emerge from Africa, and have probably lived in the Andaman Islands for up to 60,000 years.

There you go, some facts about the islands. Happy friday 🙂 and yeah its New Year’s for many of Indian States like Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Punjab etc. So happy new year to all of you 🙂 It’s Vishu for me ❤  

Happy blogging!!! Live.Love.Laugh ❤ ❤ ❤ 

#ATOZCHALLENGE DAY 11: K for KAALAPANI (Story of Prison Life)

Kaalapani (derived from Sanskrit words ‘Kal’ which means Time or Death and ‘Pani’ which means Water), was a colonial prison in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India. The prison was used by the British especially to exile political prisoners to the remote archipelago. This was the Cellular Jail about which i had spoken in my previous blog. 

Why was it called Kaalapani? – Apart from the tortures the prisoners went through in the Cellular Jail there were many other factors that added to the name of Kaalapani. There was no escape from these islands back then. Even if one managed to escape from the Jail, it was difficult to survive the harsh climate of the islands. Most of the prisoners who tried escaping , died due to diseases like Malaria and ones who survived the nature were killed by the native Tribes of the island. There was no way one could swim and reach anywhere but be deadlocked in these chain of islands.

I would like to share the STORY OF PRISON LIFE from the autobiographies of some of the famous freedom fighters who spent their youth in getting India its freedom.

Extract from the autobiography of Barindra Kumar Ghosh
“The next morning we came out and washed our faces and then had for the first time the darshan of GANJI, otherwise called KANJI. It means boiled rice churned in water – one may say a sort of rice-porridge. We were given each a dabbu full of this dainty…………“The daily ration per meal is as follows—Rice 6 oz, flour for roti 5 oz, dal 2 oz, salt 1 dram, oil ¾ dram and vegetable 8 oz…………….“Each of us was given an iron plate and an iron dish, red with rust and smeared with oil. These could not be cleansed at all. “A half pant, a Kurta and a white cap were provided for each prisoner. But he was not provided with any change for taking bath except a langoti which hardly covered the nudity.“……….The langoti we were given to put on while bathing could not in the least defend any modesty. Thus when we had to change our clothes we were in as helpless a condition as Draupadi in the assembly of the Kauravas. There was no help. We hung our heads low and somehow finished the bathing affair. Then I understood that here there was no such thing as gentleman, not even perhaps such a thing as man. Here were only convicts,”
“After finishing the ‘breakfast’ with the ganji or kanji every prisoner had to commence the work allotted to him which kept him engaged practically the whole of the day with a short break at midday for lunch. The principal work which was also the hardest was connected with coconut.
“To pound the coir and extract fibers out of it, to prepare again ropes out of those fibers to grind dry coconut and also mustard in the machine and bring out oil, to make bulbs for hooks from the shells-these formed the principal items of work for the prisoners,………
“The most difficult work was coir-pounding and oil-grinding………… Each one was given the dry husk of twenty coconuts. The husk had first to be placed on a piece of wood and then to be beaten with a wooden hammer till it became soft. Then the outer skin had to be removed. Then it was dipped in water and moistened and then again one had to pound it. By sheer pounding the entire husk inside dropped off, only the fibers remaining. These fibers had then to be dried in the sun and cleaned. Each one was expected to prepare daily a roll of such fibers weighing one seer” 

Based on autobiographies of Savarkar & Ullaskar Dutt
Oil- grinding was the most difficult work allotted to prisoners in the Cellular Jail. This was the hardest work and caused the death of some, insanity of one and a general strike of the prisoners. It furnishes the most pathetic evidence of callousness bordering on inhumanity on the part of the authorities.
Savarkar, describes it ………. “We were to be yoked like animals to the handle that turned the wheel .Hardly out of bed, we were ordered to wear a strip of cloth, were shut up in our cell and made to turn the wheel of the oil mill. ……….. . The door was opened only when meal was announced. The man came in and served the meal in the pan and went away and the door was shut. If after washing his hands one were to wipe away the perspiration of his body,the jamadar who was the worst of gangsters in the whole lot would go at him with loud abuse. There was no water for washing hands. Drinking water was to be had only by propitiating the jamadar, while you were at kolu; you felt very thirsty. The waterman gave no water except for a consideration which was to palm off to him some tobacco in exchange. If one spoke to jamadar his retort was,” A prisoner is given only two cups of water and you have already consumed three. Whence can I bring you more water? From your father?” we have put down the retort of the jamadar in the most decent language possible. If water could not be had for wash and drink what can be said of water for bathing?

While describing the prison life Ullaskar Dutt narrates-“In our village only oxen are harnessed to the oil presses and even they can not extract more than 16 pounds of mustard –oil in one day. Here, in the Cellular Jail, I was harnessed to the oil mill with two other prisoners and were required to produce eighty pounds of coconut oil by evening. The Jamadars would make us gallop and if our pace slackened, we were beaten mercilessly. We would stumble and fall, and be beaten senseless everyday.”

Such were the hardships that the freedom fighters faced every single minute of their lives spend in the Kaalapani. If you ever get a chance to visit the islands, if not the beaches make sure you visit the Cellular Jail. Feel the unbelievable sacrifices thousands of young men made, in the prime of their lives, for the cause of India’s Independence.

P.S : missed the post for yesterday J ,gonna publish it tomorrow (facepalm 😦 ) and am sure you would love it when published. It’s going to be about the famous Tribes of the islands – JARAWAS

Happy Blogging!!! Live.Love.Laugh ❤ ❤ ❤

#ATOZCHALLENGE DAY 09: I FOR ISLANDS AND THE INDEPENDENCE STRUGGLE

Content Courtesy – Andaman Tourism

I realized that as am doing my study on the Andaman Islands there are quite a few things which even i was not aware 🙂 Something to be mentioned in the #ReflectionPost 🙂 For instance, 

The Chinese knew of the Andaman & Nicobar  Islands over a 1000 years ago and called it the ‘Yeng-t-omag’.  The Andaman & Nicobar Islands also find a place in the first map of the world drawn by Ptolemy, the Roman geographer during the 2nd Century. He called it ‘Angdaman islands (Islands of good fortune). During the 6th C entury I’T Sing, a Buddhistmonk, named it ‘Lo-jen – kuo’ (Land of the Naked). Two Arab travelers during  the 8th Century referred to these  islands  as ‘Lakhabalus or Najabulus ‘(Land of the Naked). The great traveller Marco Polo called it ‘Angamanian’.

The Andaman & Nicobar Islands remained the abode of the Negritos and the Mongoloids,  for centuries.

pit created by japanese during WWII

The history of these islands could be divided into 4 broad periods:

a)  the period of seclusion
b) the British regime 
c) the Japanese regime
d) and the Post-Independence period.

and.nic.in

The modern history of Andaman & Nicobar Islands can be traced back to 1789 when the Governor General of British India commissioned a survey of these Islands by Lt Archibald Blair, who conducted the first  topo-cum-hydrographical survey and reported suitability for human settlement. Immediately thereafter, in 1790 the first settlement  was  established at Port  Blair (then Port Cornwallis) in the present day Chatham Island by bringing Criminals from undivided India. However, high mortality due to malaria and frequent attacks by aborigines forced the settlement to be shifted to a new port in North Andaman during 1792.  However, due to natural calamities, the British left the Andman & Nicobar Islands by 1796.

Though little is known about Portuguese activities in these islands, it is evident that the Portuguese missionaries started preaching Christianity among the islanders. The Nicobarese language also reflects a few Portuguese words. The missionaries entered the Nicobar group of Islands in 17th century. 

In 1756,  the Dutch colonised Nancowry group of Islands and stayed there up to 1787. After several unsuccessful attempts to build up a colony in Nancowry, the Dutch Government ultimately handed over Nicobar group of Islands to the British, who took possession in 1869.

It was in 1857, after India’s First War of Independence, that a penal colony was attempted at Port Blair with an initial lot of 200 freedom fighter who, for the first time, attempted to over throw British rule in India. The Britishers established their colony in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands for the second time in 1858.During this colonization the British Officials and soldiers settled in large groups.
The Britishers sent the convicts from India and Burma to the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. They separated the Indians who fought for the country’s independence and were sent to these islands by ships. They were chained and were sent into the dense forests to fell the trees and clear the lands. They were allotted stipulated time and were ordered to complete the works within the stipulated time. The prisoners who protested were hanged to death.

The number of freedom fighters increased to 773 within 3 months.The famous “Battle of Aberdeen” between civilized men and Stone Age aborigines of Andamans was fought on 14th May 1859 at Aberdeen Bazaar. During 1869 – 70 many Wahabi Movement activists who rose against the British rule were deported from the Central and United Provinces of undivided India to Andaman.  One amongst them was Mohd. Sher Ali Khan (a Pathan),who assassinated Lord Mayo, the Viceroy and Governor General of India on 08 February  1872 at Hope Town Jetty.  Later,in the same year, Sher Ali Khan was executed in Viper Island by the British.

The first Prison and Hangman’s Noose were built at a small island named Viper. There were no sufficient cells to prison the convicts at Viper Island. Therefore, on 13 September 1893, the British Government of India, ordered the construction of Cellular jail to accommodate 600 prisoners. Prior to construction of the Cellular Jail, male convicts were held on Viper Island and women convicts at South Point.

Then occurred the great uprising of moplahs, the Moplah Rebellion during 1921 (my grandfather, mom’s dad happen to come during this time to the Islands) About 1400 Moplahs mosly from Muslim dominated districts of Ernad, Walluvanad and Calicut of Kerala were sent to Andamans with their families for rebelling against the British rule.

During World War 2 ,  the British abandoned these Islands in a haste due to  advancing Japanese Forces, allowing Japanese occupation of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. The Japanese brutally ruled the territory for 4 years from 1942 to 1945.(i have heard sad stories from my parents about this who learnt it from their parents) During this period, Japanese built heavy Military infrastructure in  these  Islands. 

Port Blair harbour was used as a forward surveillance base for Sea planes of the Japanese forces. A few months after the Japanese occupation, allied forces succeeded in blocking Sea lanes threatening the Island population to the brink of starvation. Japanese successfully averted the disaster through enforced intensive community of farming of tubers like tapioca and sweet potato. Extensive road network expansion was also undertaken at that time for connecting Port Blair outlying villages and cultivate land. 

On  7th  October 1945, the  Armada carrying 116 Indian infantry brigade of South East Asian allied Land force under the command of Brigadier A.J. Solomon surrounded Port Blair, compelling about 20,000 Japanese soldiers to surrender on 9th  October 1945.

With the advent of Indian Independence on 15th August 1947, these islands were merged with the Indian main stream.

Happy Blogging!!! Live.Love.Laugh ❤ ❤ ❤

#ATOZCHALLENGE DAY 07: G for GEOGRAPHICAL IMPORTANCE

This could be a sensitive topic that I am discussing today as part of the #AtoZChallenge and hence it was much needed that i do a thorough reading of all the facts behind it. All the details have been taken from the and.nic.in website and other Indian defense forums. It’s about

Geographical Importance of Andaman and Nicobar Islands 

As you know in the Bay of Bengal, far removed from the mainland, lie the 572 islands of Andaman and Nicobar, which form India’s southeast border. While the northernmost part of the archipelago is only 22 nautical miles away from Myanmar, the southernmost point, called the Indira Point, is a mere 90 nautical miles from Indonesia. These islands dominate the Bay of Bengal and the Six Degree and Ten Degree channels which more than 60,000 commercial vessels traverse each year.

Operators on Navy’s Boeing P-81 search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.  Source – Wikipedia

Among the nine major bottlenecks that control entry to this region are the Malacca Strait and the Six Degree Channel. The Andaman and Nicobar Islands lie in this strategically important zone, meaning that India with its growing naval capabilities could play a significant role in controlling access . 

India’s Navy chief, Admiral R K Dhowan recently acknowledged that the Andaman and Nicobar Islands are a “very very important aspect” of India’s security, acting as extended arms of the country. Dhowan said that India needed to deploy naval assets to the islands for surveillance in important sea lines of communication.

The Indian Ocean has become an important aspect in China’s foreign policy, as it links Chinese sea lines of communications (SLOCs) to African and Middle Eastern energy as well as European trade routes. The Indian Ocean region (IOR) contains China’s most important SLOCs: as much as 75 percent of China’s oil imports (more than 6 million barrels daily) come from the Middle East and Africa. This maritime presence is supplemented by Chinese investments in port facilities that ring the IOR. Chinese scholars view the Indian Ocean as an area of potential rivalry between India and China, according to naval scholar Toshi Yoshihara.

The growing influence of China in the IOR is already causing concern in India. If India fails to use its geographic advantages in the region, it will face an emboldened PLAN. The geostrategic position of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands makes them central to any Indian response to rising Chinese influence in the IOR. Strengthening capabilities in this area would force the PLAN to shift its focus from the Western Pacific to the Indian Ocean, which could tax Chinese forces and attention. China’s growing presence in the Indian Ocean is assured; but India’s role is still emerging. Fortifying the Andaman-Nicobar Islands would be the first step toward a more robust Indian Ocean strategy

As of now to maintain the security of the country and the islands has the only Andaman and Nicobar Command. It is the only tri-service command of the Indian Armed Forces based at Port Blair. It was created in 2001 to safeguard India’s interests. As of 2014, the command includes 15 ships of the Indian Navy, two Navy Sea bases, four Air Force and Naval Air bases and two Army brigades. 

Coco Islands

Andaman Islands were occupied by East India Company in 18th century. Later they established a panel colony on Andaman and coconuts from Coco islands were mainly food for it. But due to improper governance, British transferred Coco islands to the government of lower Burma and eventually they became a part of British Burma. Later in 1937, when Burma was separated from India, they remained Burmese territory. In 1948, when Burma got Independence, they became part of newly formed union of Burma.

Considering the location of these islands, they are highly strategic for India, China and Burma. From the beginning, China had an eye on these islands in order to monitor India’s naval and other significant activities in Indian ocean. Coco islands were allegedly leased to China in 1994. However, the government of China and Myanmar denied this. In order to monitor Indian naval activities especially in the crucial point in shipping routes between the Bay of Bengal and the Strait of Malacca, China supposedly established a signal intelligence (SIGINT) station on COCO island in 1992.

I hope the Indian Administration works more strictly towards increasing its security and tighten all possible loopholes that could cause any foreign entity to harm the Indian Defense system. 

This is the information i could gather from various sources, hope it is of some help to you all to understand these islands are more than just a tourist destination. It is strategically important to the country. 

Happy blogging!!! Live.Love.Laugh ❤ ❤ ❤

#ATOZCHALLENGE DAY04: D FOR DUGONG

Have you ever heard of this word Dugong? Any guesses you want to make before you start reading… let me tell you, this is definitely not a place in Andaman(if that helps) . …….. Alright lets not bother you too much and reveal the mystery. Dugong is a medium sized marine animal which is also called the Sea Cow or Sea Pig which happens to be the State Animal of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. 

The word “dugong” derives from the Tagalog term dugong which was in turn adopted from the Malay duyung, both meaning “lady of the sea”. 

  • The Dugong is the only strictly marine herbivorous mammal
    It mainly survives on sea grass and other aquatic vegetation
  • Dugong is distributed in shallow tropical waters in Indo-Pacific Region.
  • The animal is about three-metre length and weighs about 400 kg.
    The dugong has a fusiform body with no dorsal fin or hind limbs. The forelimbs or flippers are paddle-like.
  • The dugong is easily distinguished from the manatees by its fluked, dolphin-like tail, but also possesses a unique skull and teeth. Its snout is sharply downturned, an adaptation for feeding in benthic seagrass communities. The molar teeth are simple and peg-like
  • The dugong is hunted for its meat and oil.
  • The IUCN lists the dugong as a species vulnerable to extinction, while the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species limits or bans the trade of derived products
  • It has a long lifespan of 70 years or more, and slow rate of reproduction, one of the major reasons for dugongs more vulnerable to extinction
  • In India Dugong is reported from Gulf of Kutch, Gulf of Mannar, Palk Bay and Andaman & Nicobar Islands. Within A&N Islands Dugong has been reported from Ritchie”s Archipelago, North Reef, Little Andaman and parts of Nicobars

    PC – Nelson Raju

Personally I have never seen one in real back home except for the pictures and its model in the museum.

There you go, a new information (if you didn’t know about it earlier) to be added as part of #atozchallenge 🙂 . What is your State/Country animal?  Ever heard about Dugong before, let me know in the comments if your place also has some endangered species like these.

Happy Blogging !!! Live.Love.Laugh !!!

 

 

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